Jarom Fawson

The entrepreneurs we work with put everything on the line.

Jarom talks about his first backbreaking job, the little people he drives around, and how both have shaped who he is today.

From water to icicles

The warehouse was open, so during the winter it was freezing. We’d wear rubber rain suits that would drip with icicles and run hot water over our hands to warm up.

Kid rules

I’ve come to realize I have far less to do with who these small humans are than I’d expected to. Children are emergent phenomena. They grow like mushrooms.

The beast of burden

For founders, the responsibility is all on their shoulders and they have to be good at everything. After we partner, it’s amazing to see founders settle in and shrug off some of that burden.

Entering into a partnership with us is a critical step for them and for us. The decisions we make together have real weight and consequences.

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What was your first paying job?

It was probably my hardest. At a local water bottling plant. Backbreaking, monotonous work. We’d fill, cap and stack the bottles onto pallets. Those 5 gallon water bottles are heavy! The warehouse was open, so during the winter it was freezing. We’d wear rubber rain suits that would drip with icicles and run hot water over our hands to warm up.

A great story to tell your kids when they whine about walking to school.

You mean whining about being driven while eating snacks and listening to audio books? Not sure my stories have much influence. I’ve come to realize I have far less to do with who these small humans are than I’d expected to. Children are emergent phenomena. They grow like mushrooms.

What have you learned from parenting that relates to your work?

I think I’ve learned the importance of maintaining calm amid the chaos. Both parenting and my job are challenging but hugely rewarding.

Which part is challenging? What brings you joy?

The entrepreneurs we work with put everything on the line. Their personal financial situation is often completely dependent on the success of the company and it isn’t clear what they’d do next if it doesn’t work out. Entering into a partnership with us is a critical step for them and for us. The decisions we make together have real weight and consequences. That’s both challenging and satisfying.

In your prior life you did a lot of work in the health care sector. How does that compare to working with brands and consumer products?

Well, health care is obviously incredibly important and impacts all of us, but it’s hard to have a conversation around the dinner table about dialysis equipment or wound care clinics. It’s awesome to talk to my family or friends about the brands I’m working with now. I’ll mention one to them and they’ll say, “Hey I love that brand, we use it all the time!”

How do the entrepreneurs you work with experience the relationship?

You’ll have to ask them! But being an entrepreneur can be a lonely place – the responsibility is all on their shoulders and they have to be good at everything. After we partner, it’s amazing to see founders settle in and shrug off some of that burden because now they have financial backing, advisors and resources that can help fill in the gaps.

If only your little mushrooms at home could appreciate your influence.

If only! But hey, they’re still young.

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