Rebecca Gilbert

I was drawn to VMG’s commitment to diversity. Our differing backgrounds and perspectives make us a stronger group of investors.

A Texan by birth, Rebecca grew up around the unbranded homogeneity of the petrochemical industry.
Today, the personal, passionate nature of consumer brands is a source of constant inspiration.

Mom's Always Right

This seems so simple but the lesson I got from my mom still serves me today: always be kind to others.

Don't Mess With Texas

Houston is in my blood: TexMex, country music, the Houston Rodeo, wildflowers (esp. bluebonnets). Having lived in other cities, I appreciate how friendly and neighborly Houston is. And of course I’ll always say “y’all”.

Branded consumer products instead touch our lives and as they become part of our daily routines we become personally attached to those we love and trust. We know their backstory!

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Let’s start at the beginning. How would you describe yourself as a child?

Outspoken and competitive! Always the group leader and decision-maker. Honestly? I was a little bossy.

What early lessons did you get from your family?

This seems so simple but the lesson I got from my mom still serves me today: always be kind to others. I also learned that it’s not only ok, but important to make mistakes. Every failure is a mini life lesson. Each one makes us smarter, stronger and more resilient.

Sounds like out of the Entrepreneurs handbook.

Yup.

Did growing up in Texas shape you?

Houston is in my blood: TexMex, country music, the Houston Rodeo, wildflowers (esp. bluebonnets). Having lived in other cities, I appreciate how friendly and neighborly Houston is. And of course I’ll always say “y’all”.

What attracted you to consumer products instead of, for example, finance or technology or other areas of business? What attracted you to consumer products instead of, for example, finance or technology or other areas of business?

I compare working in the consumer space to working in the petrochemical industry (Houston, remember?) Filling your car with gas is part of your weekly routine, but you don’t get excited about the gasoline itself. You probably don’t prefer a certain brand of gasoline and don’t really care where it was originally drilled or refined. At the end of the day, gasoline is a commodity. Branded consumer products instead touch our lives and as they become part of our daily routines we become personally attached to those we love and trust. We know their backstory! We’re cheerleaders for our favorite brands. I just love that. The founders we work with give birth to the unique personalities of their brands and build this trust.

Sounds like you love working with founder-driven brands.

I really do. Each has a genuine purpose for why they exist and an origin story. This is typically sustained and nurtured by the founder, regardless of how much the business eventually grows and scales. Working to grow a business while maintaining its original values and mission is thrilling to me. Because this is exactly what attracts consumers to these founder-led brands.

Speaking of attraction, what drew you to VMG?

I worked in private equity after college and became acutely aware of the homogeneity of most investment teams, committees and the industry as a whole. VMG is a welcome exception. I was drawn to their active commitment to diversity and inclusion as evidenced by the diversity of its own team and senior leadership. Our differing backgrounds and perspectives make us a stronger group of investors than those who approach the D&I issues reactively. It’s just part of VMG’s people-first culture. From our internal team to founder partners, VMG is always supportive, transparent, and respectful.

It all comes down to kindness.

Mom’s always right, y’all.

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